Stereo Embers: A Beautiful And Continual Metamorphosis: GEA’s Butterflies

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Helsinki, Finland-based alternative pop songstress GEA floats in the rarified realm of a subdued Bjork and Kate Bush, caressing the senses with electro-ambient and piano pop soundscapes and her hushed to bright, Scandi-accented, airy vocals.

In April of this year she released her Pink EP. The title track from that has made its way onto GEA’s latest record, the radiant, reflective, and buoyantly fluttering Butterflies. The artist has described this LP as her personal voyage into blossoming into who she is today, and how that journey is continual and never static.

The sounds captured on Butterflies are equally ephemeral, flitting to and fro, delightfully restless in their quest and attainment of beautiful melodies and charming harmonies. There is also plenty of introspection, lyrics-wise, about uncertainty, self-identity, fear of change, and emotional strength and metamorphosis.

Calling card “Pink” is a reflective piano piece with electronic touches and an ever-shifting energy that is wrapped in a serene exterior. On “Friendship Hoax”, GEA sings in a child-like tone against high piano plink, a burbling beat, and hit chimes. GEA yearns poignantly on “Alone”, lilting through lines about being “away from home.” She’s accompanied by sharply bittersweet violin, contemplative piano notes, and a muffled beat.

“Little Detail” features muted trumpet, delicately rippling piano, a squelching beat, and GEA plaintively exclaiming how a plant needs to, “…reach for the sky, the rainbow, the light.”, a reference to the change and growth that GEA is experiencing on her odyssey as a person.

GEA is joined by a male vocalist on “Real You And Me”, an upbeat, more pop-oriented number. A dynamic drum beat tracks through percussive accents as GEA and her vocal consort sing-talk about how, “…I could teach you how to fly / …up in sky.” Album-ender “Butterflies” is a stripped down, but potent composition of just GEA singing, backed by light piano notes. The song is a lesson in courage and following your dreams, with GEA revealing, “No one taught them how to fly / They just open their wings to try.” It’s a fitting statement and destination for the album, just one stopping point on GEA’s (and our) (ad)venture of personal exploration and transformation.

Read the full review here.